16 Top-Rated Tourist Attractions in Singapore – The 2018 Guide (part 3)

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12. Night Safari Singapore

Night Safari Singapore puts a new twist on the traditional zoo experience by introducing visitors to the nocturnal lives of the residents. The park’s habitats are divided into four sections, each with its own trail that lets you observe these elusive creatures as they go about their “day.” The Leopard Trail has, as expected, leopards, as well as lions, flying foxes, civets, and porcupines among other animals. The Fishing Cat Trail tours the habitat of animals native to Singapore, including the fish-loving felines, pangolin, binturong, and other species both common and endangered. East Lodge Trail features Malayan tigers and spotted hyenas, and the Wallaby Trail introduces visitors to the marsupials of Australia. Private tours, buggy rides, and educational sessions are available, as well as once in a lifetime experiences, as an Asian elephant feeding session.

Address: 80 Mandai Lake Road, Singapore

13. Merlion Park

Singapore’s Merlion is just what it sounds like – the figure of a mythical creature that has the head of a lion and the body and tail of a fish. The Merlion represents the city’s humble start as a fishing village combined with its traditional Malay name Singapura – “lion city.” The structure, which was relocated to Merlion Park in 2002, where it can overlook Marina Bay, weighs 70 tonnes and stands at 8.6 meters tall, spouting water from its mouth in a fountain. The “Merlion Cub” sits nearby, only two meters tall but a hefty three tonnes, and there are five additional official Merlion statues throughout the city. Merlion Park is an ideal spot for photo-ops, whether you are taking a selfie in front of the iconic creature or capturing the magnificent views from the park as it looks out over the bay.

Address: One Fullerton, Singapore

14. Asian Civilisations Museum

If the Raffles Hotel and Fort Canning Park haven’t satisfied your taste for colonial architecture, pay a visit to the Empress Place Building. It was constructed in 1865 and built in the Neoclassical style, and was named in honor of Queen Victoria. It now houses the Asian Civilisations Museum, which delves into the many Asian cultures that helped form Singapore. The museum’s collections focus on the themes of trade and spirituality, both of which heavily influenced Asian cultures and served as vehicles for the cultures to spread. Exhibits include topics like Indian Ocean trade, stories of faith and belief, and a look at the important role that scholars played in Chinese culture for centuries.

Address: 1 Empress Pl, Singapore

Official site: http://acm.org.sg

15. Pulau Ubin (Granite Island)

For a look at what life in Singapore was like before it was all glamor and skyscrapers, visit the small island of Pulau Ubin, where fewer than 100 people still live in the same simple way as they did in the 1960s. The island’s name is Malay for “Granite Island,” a moniker given due to its past prominence as a quarry town. Today, it is a peaceful, rustic place where tourists can enjoy unspoiled forests and diverse wildlife. The island is also home to the Chek Jawa Wetlands, which contain a coral reef teeming with sea life. The island is easily reached by boat, a ten-minute ride that departs from Changi Point Ferry Terminal.

16. Fort Canning Park

As military strongholds go, Fort Canning has had a long and varied life. Built in 1859, the fort was an essential site for Singapore’s defense. Now in peacetime, the original building is home to modern performing arts troupes, and the park regularly sees picnics, concerts, theater performances, and festivals. Other attractions at the park include relics from Singapore’s early history, from as far back as the 14th century, and Sir Stamford Raffles’ personal bungalow. Guests can also see a replica of the spice market Raffles established in 1822, as well as the ASEAN sculptures that were erected in the 1980s.

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